What is Trans-1,2-Dichloroethylene?

More popularly known as 1,2-dichloroethylene or 1,2-DCE, the colorless liquid is one or a mixture of cis or trans isomers with the molecular formula C2H2CI2. The organochloride is highly flammable, with a sharp, ether-like odor. 1,2-DCE is insoluble in water, denser than water, and with vapors more substantial than air.

How Does Trans-1,2-Dichloroethylene Get in the Water?

The trans isomer of 1,2-dichloroethylene is a byproduct of the production of vinyl chloride. The organic gas, vinyl chloride, is released into the environment either as wastewater or emission. It may leak into groundwater and contaminate the affected water supply.

What are the Health Risks Associated with Trans-1,2-Dichloroethylene?

Individuals with continuous exposure to the chemical contaminant may experience brain and nervous system problems, liver damages, and immune system issues. Although minimal exposure to 1,2-DCE isn’t a cause for alarm, children, pregnant women, and the elderly should not consume contaminated drinking water.

How Do You Remove Trans-1,2-Dichloroethylene from Drinking Water?

Trans-1,2-dichloroethylene, like other chemical contaminants, can be removed from drinking water with the use of granular activated carbon and Reverse Osmosis. Although quite expensive, Reverse Osmosis (RO) is a smart investment if you want to protect your family from water pollutants. Since most water filter systems incorporate activated carbon in their filter units, they are affordable ways to remove chemical contaminants to below the MCL level.

List of Contaminants

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